2:59:32 SisterCindy

Evangelist Christian preacher and TikTok star known as Sister Cindy speaks to a crowd of UK students on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021, at Memorial Hall in Lexington, Kentucky. Photo by Michael Clubb | Staff

Evangelist preacher and TikTok star “Sister Cindy” visited UK on Nov. 9 to preach about being a “ho no mo.” Cindy Smock and her husband Jed travel to college campuses all over the country to perform these “slut-shaming shows.”

Around noon, Smock began setting up at the amphitheater at UK’s Memorial Hall to take selfies with students and sign Bibles. Her “ho no mo’” sermon started around 1 p.m., and once students heard what was happening, they flocked to the area to see the viral sensation.

Smock’s speech covered virginity, big pharma and feminists, who she called “feminazis.”

“These feminazis … want to grab you by the balls and squeeze the life out of you,” said Smock in her speech. “They have been raised by the state schools and taught since they were real little that you men are the cause of all the world’s problems.” 

Another focal point of her sermon was to warn men at the university about “the dangers of vampire hos,” who she described as feminist women who want to weaken men by seducing them. 

“Boys, around this campus, the vampire hos don’t carry a golden cup; they carry a red solo cup. And I don’t care how pretty she is, if you see a girl coming towards you with a red solo cup, you run,” Smock said. “She has alcoholic beverages in that cup. She wants to get you intoxicated so she can have her way with you. Vampire hos are notorious date rapists.”

After she finished her “good old-fashioned slut shaming,” as she describes on her social media, Smock introduced her husband, known as Brother Jed, to reinforce why they believe that premarital sex is an abomination. 

Smock had students come on stage so she could hand out “ho no mo’” and “never a hoe” pins, and she even had one student answer five questions about her sexual history as a “virginity test.” Her last question, asking if the student had ever had lesbian sex, was met with cheers from the audience.

At one point during her sermon, the crowd erupted in cheers and a chant from protestors to “kill all men.”

Many students don’t agree with her message, and some even think that it’s a bit for fame. Junior Lexi Crockett, who came to the sermon with a pride flag in hand, thinks that what Smock is doing is smart, no matter how many people disagree with her. 

“I think she is using pop culture to get her message across. She fully believes what she is saying, and she’s doing it in a way that other people haven’t,” Crockett said.

Isaac Sutherland, a member of Christian Student Fellowship, believes that she is spreading the wrong message for Christianity on UK’s campus. 

“This is objectively everything we go against,” Sutherland said. “Everything we want to preach is the idea that there is acceptance [in religion], and that we can love people after the fact. There’s acceptance, then love.”

Sutherland pointed out that CSF events are focused on sympathy and acceptance, attitudes that were not communicated in Smock’s speech. 

“We had an event for people to talk about parts of their lives that are broken and here she points out other people,” he said. “Why would people want to come here and hear that they are broken?”